Let’s Work Together

As the country moves forward, I am reminded of a great song everyone needs to hear.

Known for his song Kansas City, Wilbert Harrison’s Let’s Work Together still holds true today!

Lyrics:

Together we stand, divided we fall
Come on now people, let’s get on the ball and work together
Come on, come on let’s work together, now now people
Because together we will stand, every boy every girl and a man

Before when things go wrong, as they sometimes will
And the road you travel, it stays all uphill
Let’s work together, come on, come on, let’s work together
You know together we will stand, every boy, girl, woman and a man

Oh well now, two or three minutes, two or three hours
What does it matter now, in this life of ours
Let’s work together, come on, come on
Let’s work together, now now people
Because together we will stand, every boy, every woman and a man

Oh come on, let’s work togetherOh well now, make someone happy, make someone smile,
Let’s all work together and make life worthwhile
Let’s work together, come on, come on
Let’s work together, now now people
Because together we will we stand, every boy, girl, woman and a man

Well now, together we will stand,
Every boy, girl, woman and a man

From Songfacts.com:

Wilbert Harrison originally wrote and recorded this blues-style R&B number as “Let’s Stick Together,” a plea for fidelity in a fractured marriage. That version, released in 1962, didn’t make the charts (until Bryan Ferry covered it in 1976) but never left Harrison’s mind. Seven years later, he resurrected the song, keeping the melody but changing the lyrics. “I thought I’d put some words to it that meant a bit more,” he told Beat Instrumental in 1970.

Changing the title to “Let’s Work Together,” Harrison’s new message of unity was aimed at a nation rife with conflict over the Civil Rights Movement and the Vietnam War.

Sue Records, a small New York label, released this as a two-part single in 1969 but it took around nine months reach the charts. It peaked at #32 in February 1970. In November, a cover by the blues-rock band Canned Heat landed at #26 (#2 UK). It was Harrison’s second and last Top 40 hit. His first was a decade earlier when his cover of the Leiber and Stoller tune “Kansas City” hit #1.

Canned Heat’s version was used in the movies Forrest Gump (1994), Big Fish (2003), and Invincible (2006).

Dwight Yoakam also did a fantastic version! Here is the original, Canned Heat, and Dwight